Mar 21, 2013 - Biblical Diet Plan, Science    No Comments

Can one Can Of Soda Really Cause Diabetes?

A new study seems to suggest that one can of soda a day seriously increases the likelihood of a person getting diabetes.  The Diet Doctor reads the tea leaves thus

Looking at the available sugar during the last decade in 175 countries the relationship is clear: The more sugar available, the more diabetes. Less sugar, less diabetes.

One extra can of soda per day corresponds to an extra 1.1 percent prevalence of diabetes. If correct this would mean a single extra can of soda per day would cause 3,500,000 more people to suffer from diabetes – just in the US. A relationship that rivals the disease-causing effects of smoking.

This relationship is clear even when correcting for other possible causes like obesity. In other words: Here’s more support for the theory that excess sugar does not just make you fat. Sugar can probably make you sick even before you get fat.

To be fair, this study is just about statistical correlations: it does not prove causality. But it’s another smoking gun for the sugar industry to try to explain away.

You can read the study for yourself here.

The more I learn and study on the subject of health and nutrition the more I believe that 90% of all disease can be avoided and cured by avoiding carbohydrates among which sugar is the cheiftain and, obscene amounts of modern medicine exist in a vain effort to chemically and surgically adapt us to the modern carb rich low fat diet.

A fun question MJ and I ask ourselves every time we go to the hospital is which wings would be left if people simply ate a low carb high fat diet? We can say this for sure, the hospital would be a lot smaller and do a lot less harm.

Author: Brian

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